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Treasure Island Free Online But my mother, frightened as she was, would not consent to take a fraction more than was due to her and was obstinately unwilling to be content with less. Why Become a Member? I have said the captain was weak, and indeed he seemed rather to grow weaker 27 Spieltag 1 Bundesliga regain his strength. Instantly the figure reappeared, and making a wide circuit, began to head me off. Anarchy Reigns Unity 3D. If one of the cannonballs hits a Wild Barrel the barrel will explode to create Wilds all around it. Related games. Watch your bonus multiply with increased treasures stringed together. Business is business. Pharaoh's Live Com Anmelden Flash. Game details. The Voyage It was so decided; loaded pistols were served out to all the sure men; Hunter, Joyce, and Redruth were Pai-Gow Poker into our confidence and received the news with less surprise and a better spirit than we had looked for, and then the captain went on deck and addressed Az Tank Trouble crew. Treasure Island presents free video poker. Video Poker at Treasure Island (requires the latest version of the free Flash Player). Solve puzzles that will take you into the heart of an incredible mystery. Play The Treasures of Mystery Island free online!. PENGUINCLASSICS TREASURE ISLAND ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON was born in Edinburgh in The son of a prosperous civil engineer, he was expected to follow the family profession but finally was allowed to study law at Edinburgh University. , points on Hide Online by alya. Help us improve Treasure Island - Hidden Objects Game Treasure. Hidden. Free. TREASURE ISLAND To S.L.O., an American gentleman in accordance with whose classic taste the following narrative has been designed, it is now, in return for numerous delightful hours, and with the kindest wishes, dedicated by his affectionate friend, the author.

In one way, indeed, he bade fair to ruin us, for he kept on staying week after week, and at last month after month, so that all the money had been long exhausted, and still my father never plucked up the heart to insist on having more.

If ever he mentioned it, the captain blew through his nose so loudly that you might say he roared, and stared my poor father out of the room. I have seen him wringing his hands after such a rebuff, and I am sure the annoyance and the terror he lived in must have greatly hastened his early and unhappy death.

All the time he lived with us the captain made no change whatever in his dress but to buy some stockings from a hawker.

One of the cocks of his hat having fallen down, he let it hang from that day forth, though it was a great annoyance when it blew.

I remember the appearance of his coat, which he patched himself upstairs in his room, and which, before the end, was nothing but patches.

He never wrote or received a letter, and he never spoke with any but the neighbours, and with these, for the most part, only when drunk on rum.

The great sea-chest none of us had ever seen open. He was only once crossed, and that was towards the end, when my poor father was far gone in a decline that took him off.

Livesey came late one afternoon to see the patient, took a bit of dinner from my mother, and went into the parlour to smoke a pipe until his horse should come down from the hamlet, for we had no stabling at the old Benbow.

I followed him in, and I remember observing the contrast the neat, bright doctor, with his powder as white as snow and his bright, black eyes and pleasant manners, made with the coltish country folk, and above all, with that filthy, heavy, bleared scarecrow of a pirate of ours, sitting, far gone in rum, with his arms on the table.

Suddenly he—the captain, that is—began to pipe up his eternal song:. But by this time we had all long ceased to pay any particular notice to the song; it was new, that night, to nobody but Dr.

Livesey, and on him I observed it did not produce an agreeable effect, for he looked up for a moment quite angrily before he went on with his talk to old Taylor, the gardener, on a new cure for the rheumatics.

In the meantime, the captain gradually brightened up at his own music, and at last flapped his hand upon the table before him in a way we all knew to mean silence.

The voices stopped at once, all but Dr. The doctor never so much as moved. Then followed a battle of looks between them, but the captain soon knuckled under, put up his weapon, and resumed his seat, grumbling like a beaten dog.

Let that suffice. Soon after, Dr. T was not very long after this that there occurred the first of the mysterious events that rid us at last of the captain, though not, as you will see, of his affairs.

It was a bitter cold winter, with long, hard frosts and heavy gales; and it was plain from the first that my poor father was little likely to see the spring.

He sank daily, and my mother and I had all the inn upon our hands, and were kept busy enough without paying much regard to our unpleasant guest.

It was one January morning, very early—a pinching, frosty morning—the cove all grey with hoar-frost, the ripple lapping softly on the stones, the sun still low and only touching the hilltops and shining far to seaward.

The captain had risen earlier than usual and set out down the beach, his cutlass swinging under the broad skirts of the old blue coat, his brass telescope under his arm, his hat tilted back upon his head.

I remember his breath hanging like smoke in his wake as he strode off, and the last sound I heard of him as he turned the big rock was a loud snort of indignation, as though his mind was still running upon Dr.

He was a pale, tallowy creature, wanting two fingers of the left hand, and though he wore a cutlass, he did not look much like a fighter.

I had always my eye open for seafaring men, with one leg or two, and I remember this one puzzled me. He was not sailorly, and yet he had a smack of the sea about him too.

I asked him what was for his service, and he said he would take rum; but as I was going out of the room to fetch it, he sat down upon a table and motioned me to draw near.

I paused where I was, with my napkin in my hand. I told him I did not know his mate Bill, and this was for a person who stayed in our house whom we called the captain.

He has a cut on one cheek and a mighty pleasant way with him, particularly in drink, has my mate Bill. Ah, well! I told you. Now, is my mate Bill in this here house?

The expression of his face as he said these words was not at all pleasant, and I had my own reasons for thinking that the stranger was mistaken, even supposing he meant what he said.

But it was no affair of mine, I thought; and besides, it was difficult to know what to do. The stranger kept hanging about just inside the inn door, peering round the corner like a cat waiting for a mouse.

Once I stepped out myself into the road, but he immediately called me back, and as I did not obey quick enough for his fancy, a most horrible change came over his tallowy face, and he ordered me in with an oath that made me jump.

As soon as I was back again he returned to his former manner, half fawning, half sneering, patted me on the shoulder, told me I was a good boy and he had taken quite a fancy to me.

But the great thing for boys is discipline, sonny—discipline. So saying, the stranger backed along with me into the parlour and put me behind him in the corner so that we were both hidden by the open door.

I was very uneasy and alarmed, as you may fancy, and it rather added to my fears to observe that the stranger was certainly frightened himself.

He cleared the hilt of his cutlass and loosened the blade in the sheath; and all the time we were waiting there he kept swallowing as if he felt what we used to call a lump in the throat.

At last in strode the captain, slammed the door behind him, without looking to the right or left, and marched straight across the room to where his breakfast awaited him.

The captain spun round on his heel and fronted us; all the brown had gone out of his face, and even his nose was blue; he had the look of a man who sees a ghost, or the evil one, or something worse, if anything can be; and upon my word, I felt sorry to see him all in a moment turn so old and sick.

He bade me go and leave the door wide open. For a long time, though I certainly did my best to listen, I could hear nothing but a low gattling; but at last the voices began to grow higher, and I could pick up a word or two, mostly oaths, from the captain.

Then all of a sudden there was a tremendous explosion of oaths and other noises—the chair and table went over in a lump, a clash of steel followed, and then a cry of pain, and the next instant I saw Black Dog in full flight, and the captain hotly pursuing, both with drawn cutlasses, and the former streaming blood from the left shoulder.

Just at the door the captain aimed at the fugitive one last tremendous cut, which would certainly have split him to the chine had it not been intercepted by our big signboard of Admiral Benbow.

You may see the notch on the lower side of the frame to this day. That blow was the last of the battle. Once out upon the road, Black Dog, in spite of his wound, showed a wonderful clean pair of heels and disappeared over the edge of the hill in half a minute.

The captain, for his part, stood staring at the signboard like a bewildered man. Then he passed his hand over his eyes several times and at last turned back into the house.

I ran to fetch it, but I was quite unsteadied by all that had fallen out, and I broke one glass and fouled the tap, and while I was still getting in my own way, I heard a loud fall in the parlour, and running in, beheld the captain lying full length upon the floor.

At the same instant my mother, alarmed by the cries and fighting, came running downstairs to help me. Between us we raised his head. He was breathing very loud and hard, but his eyes were closed and his face a horrible colour.

And your poor father sick! In the meantime, we had no idea what to do to help the captain, nor any other thought but that he had got his death-hurt in the scuffle with the stranger.

I got the rum, to be sure, and tried to put it down his throat, but his teeth were tightly shut and his jaws as strong as iron.

It was a happy relief for us when the door opened and Doctor Livesey came in, on his visit to my father. The man has had a stroke, as I warned him.

Now, Mrs. Hawkins, just you run upstairs to your husband and tell him, if possible, nothing about it. It was tattooed in several places.

A great deal of blood was taken before the captain opened his eyes and looked mistily about him. First he recognized the doctor with an unmistakable frown; then his glance fell upon me, and he looked relieved.

You have been drinking rum; you have had a stroke, precisely as I told you; and I have just, very much against my own will, dragged you headforemost out of the grave.

Now, Mr. Come, now, make an effort. Between us, with much trouble, we managed to hoist him upstairs, and laid him on his bed, where his head fell back on the pillow as if he were almost fainting.

He was lying very much as we had left him, only a little higher, and he seemed both weak and excited. But he broke in cursing the doctor, in a feeble voice but heartily.

I been in places hot as pitch, and mates dropping round with Yellow Jack, and the blessed land a-heaving like the sea with earthquakes—what to the doctor know of lands like that?

And now, matey, did that doctor say how long I was to lie here in this old berth? Is that seamanly behaviour, now, I want to know?

As he was thus speaking, he had risen from bed with great difficulty, holding to my shoulder with a grip that almost made me cry out, and moving his legs like so much dead weight.

His words, spirited as they were in meaning, contrasted sadly with the weakness of the voice in which they were uttered.

He paused when he had got into a sitting position on the edge. Lay me back. Before I could do much to help him he had fallen back again to his former place, where he lay for a while silent.

Well, then, you get on a horse, and go to—well, yes, I will! He gave it me at Savannah, when he lay a-dying, like as if I was to now, you see.

What I should have done had all gone well I do not know. Probably I should have told the whole story to the doctor, for I was in mortal fear lest the captain should repent of his confessions and make an end of me.

But as things fell out, my poor father died quite suddenly that evening, which put all other matters on one side.

Our natural distress, the visits of the neighbours, the arranging of the funeral, and all the work of the inn to be carried on in the meanwhile kept me so busy that I had scarcely time to think of the captain, far less to be afraid of him.

He got downstairs next morning, to be sure, and had his meals as usual, though he ate little and had more, I am afraid, than his usual supply of rum, for he helped himself out of the bar, scowling and blowing through his nose, and no one dared to cross him.

I have said the captain was weak, and indeed he seemed rather to grow weaker than regain his strength. He clambered up and down stairs, and went from the parlour to the bar and back again, and sometimes put his nose out of doors to smell the sea, holding on to the walls as he went for support and breathing hard and fast like a man on a steep mountain.

He never particularly addressed me, and it is my belief he had as good as forgotten his confidences; but his temper was more flighty, and allowing for his bodily weakness, more violent than ever.

He had an alarming way now when he was drunk of drawing his cutlass and laying it bare before him on the table.

But with all that, he minded people less and seemed shut up in his own thoughts and rather wandering. Once, for instance, to our extreme wonder, he piped up to a different air, a kind of country love-song that he must have learned in his youth before he had begun to follow the sea.

He was plainly blind, for he tapped before him with a stick and wore a great green shade over his eyes and nose; and he was hunched, as if with age or weakness, and wore a huge old tattered sea-cloak with a hood that made him appear positively deformed.

I never saw in my life a more dreadful-looking figure. Will you give me your hand, my kind young friend, and lead me in?

I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature gripped it in a moment like a vise. I was so much startled that I struggled to withdraw, but the blind man pulled me close up to him with a single action of his arm.

The captain is not what he used to be. He sits with a drawn cutlass. It cowed me more than the pain, and I began to obey him at once, walking straight in at the door and towards the parlour, where our sick old buccaneer was sitting, dazed with rum.

The blind man clung close to me, holding me in one iron fist and leaning almost more of his weight on me than I could carry.

Between this and that, I was so utterly terrified of the blind beggar that I forgot my terror of the captain, and as I opened the parlour door, cried out the words he had ordered in a trembling voice.

The poor captain raised his eyes, and at one look the rum went out of him and left him staring sober. The expression of his face was not so much of terror as of mortal sickness.

He made a movement to rise, but I do not believe he had enough force left in his body. Business is business. Hold out your left hand. Boy, take his left hand by the wrist and bring it near to my right.

It was some time before either I or the captain seemed to gather our senses, but at length, and about at the same moment, I released his wrist, which I was still holding, and he drew in his hand and looked sharply into the palm.

Even as he did so, he reeled, put his hand to his throat, stood swaying for a moment, and then, with a peculiar sound, fell from his whole height face foremost to the floor.

I ran to him at once, calling to my mother. But haste was all in vain. The captain had been struck dead by thundering apoplexy. It is a curious thing to understand, for I had certainly never liked the man, though of late I had begun to pity him, but as soon as I saw that he was dead, I burst into a flood of tears.

It was the second death I had known, and the sorrow of the first was still fresh in my heart. LOST no time, of course, in telling my mother all that I knew, and perhaps should have told her long before, and we saw ourselves at once in a difficult and dangerous position.

Indeed, it seemed impossible for either of us to remain much longer in the house; the fall of coals in the kitchen grate, the very ticking of the clock, filled us with alarms.

The neighbourhood, to our ears, seemed haunted by approaching footsteps; and what between the dead body of the captain on the parlour floor and the thought of that detestable blind beggar hovering near at hand and ready to return, there were moments when, as the saying goes, I jumped in my skin for terror.

Something must speedily be resolved upon, and it occurred to us at last to go forth together and seek help in the neighbouring hamlet.

No sooner said than done. Bare-headed as we were, we ran out at once in the gathering evening and the frosty fog. The hamlet lay not many hundred yards away, though out of view, on the other side of the next cove; and what greatly encouraged me, it was in an opposite direction from that whence the blind man had made his appearance and whither he had presumably returned.

We were not many minutes on the road, though we sometimes stopped to lay hold of each other and hearken.

But there was no unusual sound—nothing but the low wash of the ripple and the croaking of the inmates of the wood. It was already candle-light when we reached the hamlet, and I shall never forget how much I was cheered to see the yellow shine in doors and windows; but that, as it proved, was the best of the help we were likely to get in that quarter.

For—you would have thought men would have been ashamed of themselves—no soul would consent to return with us to the Admiral Benbow.

The more we told of our troubles, the more—man, woman, and child—they clung to the shelter of their houses. The name of Captain Flint, though it was strange to me, was well enough known to some there and carried a great weight of terror.

And the short and the long of the matter was, that while we could get several who were willing enough to ride to Dr.

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